Martin Luther King Jr Day of Service

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The Man Behind the Legacy

Monday, January 15th, is Martin Luther King Jr Day: a nationally recognized holiday in the United States. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr was a famous Civil Rights Activist in the 1950’s and 1960’s, who advocated for the end of racial segregation and for racial equality in the United States. Dr. King was an executive member of the National Association of Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and was an influential pastor who eventually became head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which was at the forefront of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960’s.

Dr. King is best remembered for his role in helping to organize multiple peaceful protests that ultimately led to de-segregation laws in the United States. These protests included the famous 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott, of which Rosa Parks is famously remembered for refusing to give up her seat on a bus for a white woman. The boycott lasted 382 days, and Dr. King was threatened, his house was bombed and he was arrested during this time, but he refused to relent.

In 1963 March on Washington, DC, Dr. King delivered his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. This is one of the best remembered Civil Rights protests in United States history: 250,000 people marched on the National Mall for equal rights.

Dr. King also led the 1965 from Selma, Alabama to Montgomery, the State Capitol. During this peaceful march, Dr. King and other civil rights leaders were faced with extreme violence from the local white citizens and police.

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Dr. King and fellow Civil Rights Leaders lead the Selma March.

Thanks to Dr Martin Luther King Jr, his partnership with the NAACP and other Civil Rights leaders of the 1960s, Congress passed the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin. While this was a huge achievement and brought the United States on step closer to equality, the need for Civil Rights action is still present.

In 2017, people across the United States took up MLK’s legacy of nonviolent marching and united in the Women’s March, which took place in Washington, DC, with sister marches occurring across the country and world. In Washington DC alone, somewhere between 440,000 to 500,000 people gathered, while it is estimated over 5 million people marched across the world.

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January 21st, 2017 saw the largest protest in U.S. history gather on the National Mall.

A Day of Service

While the 3rd Monday of every January is recognized as a holiday in honor of Dr. King, many people use the day off to volunteer. The MLK Day of Service honors Dr. King’s legacy of service and action, as volunteers use the holiday to give back, especially to communities of color and underserved communities.

The Carlson Leadership Center at the University of Washington helps organize projects for students to get involved every year with different projects around King County.

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Students volunteer on the MLK Day of Service. Photo courtesy of the Carlson Leadership Center

In 2017, nearly 3,000 people across King County came together to volunteer on MLK Day of Service, including IEP students!  Volunteering is a great way to give back and stay connected to the communities around us, especially since many of the students at the University of Washington are not from King County, but benefit from it’s resources and location . Projects include environmental clean up, shelter volunteer hours, advocacy projects, and repair and decoration projects. No service is too small to preform!

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A student helps to repaint during the MLK Day of Service. Photo courtesy of the Carlson Leadership Center.

If you’re interested in participating as a UW or IEP student, you can sign up through the Carlson Leadership Center and United Way.

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Volunteers High-five at the MLK Day of Service. Photo Courtesy of the Carlson Leadership Center.

 

IELP Student Coordinators: What We’re Thankful For

In the IELP office, the student coordinators are gearing up for Thanksgiving break. However we are spending our holiday, we are all excited to have a break from school and spend time with our friends and families. To get in the holiday spirit, each coordinator answered two questions: 1) What are you thankful for this holiday season? 2) What part of studying or traveling in another country are you most thankful for?

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Isaiah

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What are you most thankful for this holiday season?

I am thankful for music and having two quarters left at UW to spend with my great friends!

What part of studying or traveling in another country are you most thankful for?

I am thankful for the opportunity I had to study in Korea. Living in Korea taught me that the United States’ view of other countries isn’t always accurate, so I am thankful I was able to visit Korea and communicate with locals myself.

Phoebe

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What are you most thankful for this holiday season?

I am thankful for the opportunity to move to Seattle and study at UW. It is wonderful to live in a city I feel so at home in. I am also thankful for my network of friends!

What part of studying or traveling in another country are you most thankful for?

I am very thankful for all the different people I’ve met while traveling and studying abroad. It is incredibly valuable to befriend people from different backgrounds, so I am thankful for the friends I’ve made around the world!

Miranda

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What are you most thankful for this holiday season?

I’m thankful for little things like peanut M&Ms, spicy chai tea, and Friday night swing dancing—in short, all the little things that have kept me sane this quarter. I’m also thankful for my favorite Thanksgiving tradition where my mom and I make Thanksgiving dinner with scalloped potatoes and the green bean casserole.

What part of studying or traveling in another country are you most thankful for?

I am thankful for the opportunity I had to explore a new city in depth. On the last day of teaching an English class in Spain, our students took us out for a tour of their city. I loved seeing the city through a local’s point of view!

Laura

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What are you most thankful for this holiday season?

I am thankful for time to relax. This quarter has been very busy, so I am excited to spend Thanksgiving weekend cooking a delicious meal with my family!

What part of studying or traveling in another country are you most thankful for?

I went abroad for the first time this summer and I am thankful for cuisine from around the world! Food is such a vital part of culture, so I enjoyed getting to know parts of Italy and Germany by the traditional food.

Dana

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What are you most thankful for this holiday season?

I am thankful for people making our communities better in Seattle and across the country! I am also thankful for the opportunity to get a good education at UW and continue my learning.

What part of studying or traveling in another country are you most thankful for?

I am thankful for my time spent teaching in Russia and Azerbaijan because I was able to travel around the country. Instead of just visiting the big cities, I saw smaller towns and surrounding nature. Coming back and telling people about Russian and Azerbaijani culture was also very rewarding!

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Regardless of where you are in the world, we hope we have inspired you to think about what you are thankful for! Have a wonderful holiday season!

Photo credits: Simple Kinder, Dreamstime.com.

Bonus Post: International Education Week #IEW

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We at International & English Language Programs are excited to celebrate global competency during International Education Week! International Education Week (#IEW) is a joint initiative between the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education to promote programs that prepare students for a global environment. Here at IELP, we are passionate about helping future leaders learn and grow at the University of Washington. We are so excited to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide!

Keep up with our #IEW posts on Facebook and Twitter. This week, come to the 13th floor of the UW Tower to view a display by IELP staff and teachers saying what we admire, appreciate, and love about our students. Stop by and take a look!

Have a great International Education Week!

Favorite Korean Dishes

This quarter, we have been discussing our favorite dishes with our IELP students! No matter where we are from, we all have a dish that reminds us of our family and culture. This week, we are highlighting Korean dishes and sharing our student’s favorites. To learn more, continue reading below:

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Kimchi (Fermented Vegetables, 김치)

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Kimchi is a delicious mix of salted and fermented vegetables. It can be served as both a side and main dish, and there are a number of variations depending on the region, family, or personal preference. There are records of fermented vegetable dishes dating back to 37 BCE, and there was even a poem written about fermented radishes in the 13th century. Although kimchi has been a traditional dish in Korea for centuries, kimchi is now becoming more common in the United States. You can find kimchi in American health food stores, and it is lauded for it’s nutritional benefits.

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Bibimbap (Mixed Rice, 비빔밥)

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Bibimbap, literally translated as “mixed rice,” is a bowl of warm rice topped with vegetables, chili pepper paste, soy sauce, or fermented soybean paste. A raw or fried egg and sliced beef are common additions. The name “bibimbap” was adopted in the 20th century, although there are records to the dish dating back to the 16th century. The dish was traditionally served on the eve of the lunar new year, and was also a common dish for farmers during harvest season because it is an easy dish to make for a large number of people. The dish is also heavy with symbolism, with the colors representing different parts of Korea and human organs.

Bulgogi (“Fire Meat,” 불고기)

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Bulgogi, literally “fire meat,” is thin, marinated slices of beef or pork grilled on a barbecue or skillet. The dish originated in North Korea, but is very popular in South Korea. Today, you can find bulgogi in South Korea anywhere from a fancy restaurant to a ready-made dish at the grocery store. During the Joseon Dynasty, the dish was prepared for the wealthy and nobility. Today, you can find bulgogi-flavored hamburgers at fast-food restaurants in South Korea. McDonald’s in Korea even sold a bulgogi burger (pictured below) before it was removed due to a possible food-contamination case.

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Japchae (Stir-Fried Glass Noodles and Vegetables, 잡채)

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Japchae is a sweet and savory dish with a type of cellophane noodles, assorted vegetables, meat and mushrooms, and seasoned with soy sauce and sesame oil. Although it was once a royal dish, it is now a popular celebration dish served on weddings, birthdays, and holidays. According to historical records, the dish was first made in the 17th century for King Gwanghaegun’s palace banquet. The king liked the dish so much that he promoted the chef to a high-ranking position, and japchae became a fixture of Korean royal court cuisine.

Matang (Candied Sweet Potato, 마탕)

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Matang is chunks of fried sweet potato coated in hot brown syrup. It is sweet and crunchy on the outside and fluffy on the inside, and topped with black sesame seeds. Matang is a popular kid’s snack in Korea, and you can find it as a side in Korean restaurants. There are records of matang originating in China, but it is still a very popular snack in Korea.

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After exploring traditional Korean dishes, we reached out to Seattle locals and asked them if they have favorite Korean restaurants in Seattle. A lot of the best restaurants are a little outside of Seattle, so we suggest making a day trip to Lynnwood if you’re interested in eating at Ka Won. If you want to explore Korean food, or want to have a taste of home, check out these places:

  1. Ka Won, Lynnwood
  2. Trove, Downtown Seattle
  3. Chan, Downtown Seattle
  4. Bok a Bok Fried Chicken, South-West Seattle

Thank you to our Korean students for inspiring us to explore Korean dishes! This post only covers a small portion of traditional Korean dishes. We encourage you to explore different cultures, foods, and restaurants in Seattle, and find your own favorite Korean dishes!

Photo Credits: foodrepublic.com, Chowhound, Pinterest, How to Feed a Loon, Facebook.com, Kimchimari, Maangchi, Wikipedia.

Halloween in America: History and Traditions

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Halloween is a beloved holiday for many Americans. Children and adults alike love to dress up in costumes, go to parties or trick or treating, and eat sweets and snacks. With all of the decorations and hype around the holiday, many people do not know the history of the holiday in America. Furthermore, people visiting the United States may be unaware of our American traditions. Through photos and stories by IELP staff, we invite you to learn more about Halloween!

History

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A Halloween party in 1924.

The original American colonies were mostly Puritan, and were against celebrating Halloween due to it’s association with evil and mischief. However, an influx of immigrants in the late nineteenth century helped popularize Halloween.

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Trick-or-treating increased in popularity as Americans began to dress up and go door-to-door, asking for food and money. While the history of Halloween was traditionally tied with ghosts, tricks, and witchcraft, there was a movement by neighborhoods to make Halloween about community and celebration. This was followed by the removal of “frightening” or “grotesque” descriptions of Halloween by parents and in newspapers, which made the holiday lose most of its religious overtones by the twentieth century.

Modern Traditions

Some traditions have remained from the early days of Halloween, but there are new traditions that are popular, especially within American colleges.

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Dressing up for Halloween is popular among people of all ages. In American colleges, finding a costume and dressing up for Halloween parties is a fun activity for many students. As pictured above, our IELP students love to dress up in fun costumes for our Mid-Quarter party!

Popular costumes include classic spooky costumes (skeletons, pumpkins, witches, and scary characters), animals, fairy-tale characters (Little Red Riding Hood, princesses), and pop culture references. Some people dress up in simple costumes, and some people like to go all out!

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Many students love to spend a couple hours with friends or family and carve a jack o’ lantern! This popular Halloween activity is known around the world, and is very popular in America. In many homes, you can see jack o’ lanterns lit with candles on Halloween night!

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Another Halloween tradition that is emerging in some American homes is “the Teal Pumpkin Project.” Homes with a teal pumpkin outside the door mean that the home is giving away non-food items, or non-allergen treats. Although most college students do not go trick-or-treating since the activity is meant for children, it is fun to know why teal pumpkins are popping up around Seattle!

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It is not uncommon to find a house in America that has Halloween decorations. Although usually not as complex as the one pictured above, many houses will be decorated with fake cobwebs, pumpkins and gourds, and other spooky decorations. While many countries celebrate Halloween, America is distinctly extravagant with decorations.

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For adults, and especially college students, there is no better way to celebrate Halloween than watching scary and classic Halloween movies. Horror movies are popular in every country, and loved year-round, but Halloween is a great time to re-watch your favorites.

There are some American movies made for children and teens that are not scary, but have a spooky element and are popular viewing during October. If you are interested, here are some favorites of our IELP staff: Halloweentown, Hocus Pocus, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Beetlejuice, and Casper.

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Whether you dress up, carve a jack o’ lantern, or watch Halloween movies, IELP wishes you a happy Halloween!

Photo credits: Pixabay, Pinterest, History by Zim, IELP, Wonderopolis, Anoka Halloween, Bustle.com

Favorite Taiwanese Dishes

Although our IELP students come from all over the world, food unites us all. We all enjoy  tasting new dishes and learning about the favorite foods of our friends and family. Last week, we spoke to Ting-Wei and Jo-Tzu, Taiwanese STEP students who both love Taiwanese food. Ting-Wei’s family even owns a traditional restaurant in Taiwan! To learn more about their favorite dishes, continue reading below:

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Lu Rou Fan (Braised Pork Rice, 滷肉饭)

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When asked what their favorite Taiwanese dish was, Ting-Wei and Jo-Tzu immediately named braised pork rice. This dish is an important icon of Taiwanese folk life, and is consumed all around Taiwan. However, different areas have slight variations in their dish, such Southern Taiwan using pork with less fat, and Northern Taiwan favoring a greasier version, sometimes with sticky rice mixed in.

Oil Rice (Youfan, 油飯)

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Jo-Tzu loves youfan, or Taiwanese “oil” rice. She told us she has fond memories associated with this dish because it is traditionally served to celebrate the birth of a child. However, you can find this dish at New Year’s meals, temple celebrations, and all around Taiwan! You can even order some at the Taichung train station (pictured below), if you are hungry while traveling. Although most variations include rice, pork, and oil, there are differences in the dish depending on the area and the family cooking it.

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Stinky Tofu (Chòudòufu, 臭豆腐)

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Ting-Wei told us stinky tofu is a traditional dish available throughout Taiwan through stands that sell stinky tofu to locals and tourists (pictured below). According to folk stories, stinky tofu was invented by accident during the Qing dynasty by a man named Wang Zhi-He. Today, stinky tofu is often fried and served with sauce and sour pickled vegetables. Barbecued stinky tofu, where the tofu is cooked with meat sauce, is recommended to people trying stinky tofu for the first time, and is thought to have been invented in Taipei’s Shenkeng District.

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Beef Noodle Soup (牛肉麵)

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Beef noodle soup is a favorite of Ting-Wei, Jo-Tzu, and IELP staff. This classic dish usually uses brisket or shank only, although some restaurants offer a more expensive version with meat and tendon. Although beef noodle soup is common in both China and Taiwan, it is considered a national dish in Taiwan. It is so loved in Taiwan that Taipei holds a Beef Noodle Festival every year, where various chefs and restaurants compete for the “Best Beef Noodle in Taiwan” award.

Tánghúlu (糖葫芦)

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Jo-Tzu’s favorite dessert is a traditional Chinese dessert that is loved throughout Taiwan. Jo-Tzu even said that she found tánghúlu at the Seattle International District-Chinatown Night Market! This snack is usually made with red or yellow hawthorn berries dipped in sugar hard candy. Although hawthorn berries are traditional, other kinds of berries and nuts are sometimes skewered and dipped in the candy. The tangy taste of hawthorn berries go well with the sweet candy coating, which is probably why this food has been loved in China and Taiwan for over 800 years.

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After the interview, we asked Seattle locals about their favorite Taiwanese restaurant in the Seattle area. If you are in Seattle and would like to try Taiwanese food, or you are from Taiwan and missing food from home, check out these places:

  1. Looking for Chai Taiwanese Kitchen
  2. Facing East
  3. Din Tai Fung
  4. Dough Zone Dumpling House (Chinese, Sichuanese, and Taiwanese food)

Thank you to Ting-Wei and Jo-Tzu for telling us about their favorite dishes! This post and our conversations with students don’t even scratch the surface of Taiwan’s culinary history. We encourage you to explore different cultures, foods, and restaurants in Seattle, and to find your own favorite dishes!

 

Photo Credits: Business Insider, Bear Naked Food, i.epoch.times.com, Smart Traveler, Wikipedia, Eater

Seattle Spotlight: Art Walks

While our Calendar of Events is a great place to find events and activities all year long, some popular Seattle events require additional explanation. As Seattle weather becomes cooler and Autumn quarter begins, there are many opportunities for students to explore all that Seattle offers.

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In 1981, Seattle art dealers printed handout maps and painted footsteps in front of their galleries to attract residents and tourists. With this, the first Art Walk in the United States was born. Art walks are community events where local artists and art dealers display their art to the public, who can view it for free. These events, which typically happen every month, are important occasions to encourage community engagement and appreciation of the arts.

  1. Fremont Art Walk

    Every first Friday from 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm. Located at Fremont Ave. N. and N. 35th St.

    fremont-art-walk-300x210The Fremont Art Walk brings Fremont shops, galleries, and restaurants together to celebrate creativity. You can experience many forms of art – from oil paintings to musical performances – while you walk through the famous Fremont neighborhood.

  2. First Thursday Seattle Art Walk

    Every first Thursday from 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm. Located at 102 First Ave.

    seattle-first-thursday-art-walkPioneer Square has over 35 art venues to visit for free on the first Thursday of every month, and many restaurants to grab a bite to eat. In addition, Pioneer Square’s Occidental Square contains a number of sculptures for visitors to enjoy any day of the month.

  3. West Seattle Art Walk

    Every second Thursday from 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm. Located at California Ave. S.W. and S.W. Alaska St.

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    Local artists, galleries, and businesses come together on the second Thursday of each month in West Seattle to display and sell art. Here, you can view beautiful pottery from Washington artists and listen to local musicians.

  4. BLITZ Capitol Hill Art Walk

    Every second Thursday from 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm. Located at Broadway and E. Pike St.

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Visit one of Seattle’s most famous neighborhoods and enjoy various mediums of art and artistic performances. Capitol Hill Art Walk features theater groups, art by prolific Seattle artists, and access to a variety of restaurants and coffee shops.

Seattle is an artistic city with a strong sense of community, and Seattle Art Walks are a fantastic way to explore Seattle neighborhoods, interact with locals, and enjoy work by talented individuals. You can learn more and access a list of all neighborhood arts walks here, and find more Seattle events using our Calendar of Events.

Photo Credits: Rich Schleifer, FIUTS, Seattle Artists, West Seattle Art Walk, Capitol Hill Art Walk

Favorite Japanese Dishes

Our IELP students come from all over the world, and our STEP 3 session has a large percentage of Japanese participants. Although I have tried basic types of (American=ized) sushi, edamame, and poke bowls, I wanted to learn more about the traditional cuisine. On our field trip to Seattle Center last Tuesday, I asked the students to share some of their favorites, and did some research to find out more about these dishes and their origins.

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Monjayaki

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Sakura Yamashita describes her favorite dish she calls “Monja” as a “hot plate mixed with vegetable and meat.”

Monjayaki is very popular in the Kantō region, and is one of Tokyo’s most famous dishes. Although often compared to okonomayaki, a similar dish made in the Kansai region, it is a lot wetter and cooks flat on one side, whereas okonomiyaki is drier, firmer and thicker. The ingredients also differ. Monja is created by frying the dry ingredients (usually some variation of cabbage, noodles, cod roe, mochi, and flour) in a circle, and filling said circle with a liquid batter after a few minutes. The result? A delicious savory pancake with the consistency of melted cheese!

Tonkatsu

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“I’m from Fukuoka so I like Tonkatsu” -Kazuhiro Fujiyama

Often simply called “katsu” in the States, this classic Japanese dish uses pork fillet or loin that is dipped in salt, pepper, flour, and beaten egg before being deep fried in a coat of “panko” or bread crumbs. It is usually served with cabbage or tsukemono (Japanese preserved vegetables), rice, and miso soup. In Korea, tonkatsu is known as don-gaseu (돈가스) or don-kkaseu (돈까스), which derived from a transliteration of the Japanese word. There are many variations of this dish, and tonkatsu is also popular as a sandwich filling (katsu sando) or served on Japanese curry (katsu karē).

Yamanashi Fruit

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Moemi Okamura explains that “peaces and grapes are the most famous in Yamanashi.”

Japan’s Yamanashi prefecture is dubbed the “kingdom of fruit,” and rightfully so! The reason lies in Yamanashi’s weather– low annual precipitation and extreme differences in heat and cold help to create sweet, juicy fruit year round. Not only is Yamanashi the biggest producer of peaches and grapes in Japan, but there are fruit picking facilities year-round boasting multiple varieties of cherries, plums, pears, strawberries, blueberries, and apples. People from all around the world flock to Yamanashi to admire their expansive orchards and to pick fresh, delicious produce.

Unagi

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 “My mom buys the eel in the supermarket but will make it at home.” -Chisa Tomono

Unagi is a cult summertime favorite among Japanese, but can cost up to 30 American dollars served in a restaurant. For this reason, many have incentive to make this delicacy at home. This calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and iron-rich treat is known to help combat the scorching summer heat. One student adds that July 25th is the designated “unagi day!” Intrigued, I did some research and discovered that the name of the period for eating Unagi is called ‘Doyo-no Ushi-no hi’. “Doyo” is an 18 day period between summer and autumn, mid July to early August, and is the hottest time of the year in Japan. “Ushi no hi” can be directly translated to Ox day, originating from the traditional Japanese calendar that uses the Chinese Zodiac system. Legend has it that a struggling eel restaurant owner during the Edo period began advertising unagi on the day of Ox, because both Ushi (Ox in Japanese) and Unagi begin with the letter ‘u’. This play on words worked well as a promotion, and eventually developed into a Japanese folklore that if you eat unagi on the day of ox, you will regain power!

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Obviously, this blog post does not scratch the surface of Japan’s rich culinary heritage. Other favorites frequently mentioned include sushi, nikujaga (boiled meat and potato), nattō (fermented soybeans), shabu-shabu (meat and vegetable hot pot), udon (thick wheat flour noodle), soba (thin buckwheat flour noodle), and wagashi (sweet snack often served with tea). However, I hope that this post could provide some insight into traditional Japanese cuisine and inspire you to try something new!

 

American as Apple Pie

Hot dogs, milkshakes, and grilled cheese are all iconic American foods, but none are quite “as American as apple pie.” A pie is a baked dish made up of a pastry dough exterior that is filled with sweet or savory ingredients. However, not all pies are made equal. Pie was initially a practical dish because it required less flour to make than bread, making it the ideal, cheap, and filling dish for hungry immigrants. As colonists (and their pie recipes) spread towards the West, variations developed and came to represent different areas of the United States.

In Northern states, Native Americans taught settlers how to extract sap from maple trees, and pumpkin pies sweetened with maple syrup became very popular in this area. Maine, which boasted a plentiful blueberry harvest each year, claimed blueberry pie as their signature dessert. The Midwest, with its abundance of dairy farms, specialized in cheese and cream pies. Southern states indulged in various kinds of “chess pie” which was filled with rich buttermilk or cream, sugar, egg, and sometimes bourbon.

Today, pies of all kinds are enjoyed throughout the States, especially during American holidays like Thanksgiving and Fourth of July. If you haven’t tasted pie yet, it is a classic (and delicious!) part of American heritage that you need to try at least once while in the States. With Independence Day coming up, you will likely find pies on display in any major American supermarket, but Seattle also has a slew of specialty pie shops if you want a taste of the traditional homemade goods. Here are a few of the most popular:

 

Pie Bar Ballard

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This family-owned business has a weekly-rotating menu of sweet and savory pies as well as craft cocktails and ciders to compliment! Check out their unique selection of treats here.

A la Mode Pies

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“Quite simply, exceptional pie – the kind Mom would be proud to serve.” – Chris Porter (Owner)

This hand-baked pie shop has expanded from its original location in West Seattle to open a second in Phinney Ridge across from the Woodland Park Zoo. Their 9-inch pies are made-to-order with the fruit filling sourced from local, organic farms. They also offer pie-making classes on Tuesdays and delivery for orders consisting of of 5 or more pies. Explore their website to browse their flavors, order online, and check out their extended summer hours.

 

Pie

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As its name would suggest, this is a one-stop-shop for all of your pie needs. Baked fresh throughout the day, each one (meat pies, vegetarian pies, sweet pies, savory pies, morning pies, late- night pies) is individually sized which ensures freshness and the perfect portion. Their menu changes daily in rotation so you can expect a new treat for your taste buds with each visit!

 

 

Pie-history Credit:

http://toriavey.com/history-kitchen/2011/07/the-history-of-pie-in-america-2/

 

Top 5 Spring Break Activities

Spring break is coming! Time to pack your suitcase and go on a short journey with your friends around Seattle!

Don’t know where to go? No worries. We have listed top 5 spring break activities for you. Let’s check them out!

1. Visit one of Washington’s three National Parks!  

Washington State is well known for its three beautiful national parks: Olympic National Park, North Cascades National Park, and Mount Rainier National Park. You can go boating, fishing, camping, hiking, tidepooling, climbing, and see various wild animals in these parks. If you are a wilderness explorer, definitely check it out!

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Olympic National Park, Credit to RootsRated, Marmot

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North Cascades National Park, PHOTOGRAPH BY GREG VAUGHN, National Geographic 

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Mount Rainier National Park

2. Visit San Juan Island! 

San Juan Island is the second-largest and most populous island of the San Juan Islands. Originally served as the seasonal fishing island by Native Americans and local people, San Juan Island is now a popular tourist site. People usually visit San Juan Island for whale watching, kayaking, cycling, fishing, hiking, and enjoying local seafood.

3. Take the ferry to Victoria, British Columbia!

Victoria is internationally renowned as the “City of Gardens”. It is also the capital city of British Columbia in Canada. You can find heritage architecture, outdoor adventures, beautiful gardens, and local seasonal events in Victoria. And it is very convenient to take the 2.5-3 hour ferry between downtown Seattle and Victoria’s Inner Harbor.

4. Take a train down to Portland or up to Vancouver

If you can’t drive to Portland or Vancouver, it is a great idea to take the train: Amtrak Cascades. Amtrak Cascades connects Vancouver, British Columbia, Seattle, Portland and Eugene, Oregon. You can also see Mount St. Helens and the Columbia River Gorge during your trip. You will get a chance to see some of the best city views and natural attractions on your way.

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Amtrak Cascades, Credit to Dealmoon

5. Have some fun in Leavenworth!

Leavenworth is a city in Chelan County, WA. The entire town center is modeled on a Bavarian village. It is a good place to relax and enjoy some local food.

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Leavenworth, Credit to Pinterest

Have fun during spring break!